PM4DEV Blog

Ideas, suggestions and general thoughts about project management for development.

Managing Quality to Meet Stakeholder Expectations

Quality management is the process for ensuring that all project activities necessary to design, plan and implement a project are effective and efficient with respect to the purpose of the objective and its performance.

Project quality management (QM) is not a separate, independent process that occurs at the end of an activity to measure the level of quality of the output. It is not purchasing the most expensive material or services available on the market. Quality and grade are not the same, grade are characteristics of a material or service such as additional features. A product may be of good quality (no defects) and be of low grade (few or no extra features).

Quality management is a continuous process that starts and ends with the project. It is more about preventing and avoiding than measuring and fixing poor quality outputs. It is part of every project management processes from the moment the project initiates to the final steps in the project closure phase.

QM focuses on improving stakeholder’s satisfaction through continuous and incremental improvements to processes, including removing unnecessary activities; it achieves that by the continuous improvement of the quality of material and services provided to the beneficiaries. It is not about finding and fixing errors after the fact, quality management is the continuous monitoring and application of quality processes in all aspects of the project.

Quality has been defined as "the totality of characteristics of an entity that bear on its ability to satisfy stated or implied needs." The stated and implied quality needs are the inputs used in defining project requirements from the donor and the beneficiaries. It means that the product or services must meet the intended objectives of the project and have a value to the donor and beneficiaries and that the beneficiaries can use the material or service as it was originally intended. The central focus of quality management is meeting or exceeding stakeholder’s expectations and conforming to the project design and specifications.

The ultimate judge for quality is the beneficiary, and represents how close the project outputs and deliverables come to meeting the beneficiaries’ requirements and expectations. How a beneficiary defines quality may be completely subjective, but there are many ways to make quality objective; by defining the individual characteristics and determine one or more metrics that can be collected to mirror the characteristic.

The main principle of project quality management is to ensure the project will meet or exceed stakeholder’s needs and expectations. The project team must develop a good relationship with key stakeholders, specially the donor and the beneficiaries of the project, to understand what quality means to them. One of the causes for poor project evaluations is the project focuses only in meeting the written requirements for the main outputs and ignores other stakeholder needs and expectations for the project.

Quality must be viewed on an equal level with scope, schedule and budget. If a project donor is not satisfied with the quality of how the project is delivering the outcomes, the project team will need to make adjustments to scope, schedule and budget to satisfy the donor’s needs and expectations. To deliver the project scope on time and on budget is not enough, to achieve stakeholder satisfaction the project must develop a good working relationship with all stakeholders and understand their stated or implied needs.

 

5
  8939 Hits
8939 Hits

Why you need email etiquette?

b2ap3_thumbnail_email-etiquette.pngAll your professional email communications needs to make an impression that you are someone that will be easy and a pleasure to work with and that you are a credible professional.  With email you only have one chance to make that first impression which will be invaluable to building trust and confidence. It’s very common that your first contact with other people will often be through email. In fact, while you may never actually meet them face to face, you might well end up having a productive ongoing email and professional relationship with them for years. 

These are three reasons why you need email etiquette

·         Avoid confusion, poorly worded emails can lead to misinterpretation or mistake

·         Efficiency: emails that get to the point are much more effective than long emails.

·         Professionalism: by using proper email language you will convey a professional image

Here are some simple rules of email etiquette you can follow in order to make sure your emails will be warmly and productively received.

  1. Check your organization’s email policy is. Many organizations have rules about the types of message that can be sent and also if your email is monitored or screened
  2. Make sure your e-mail includes a courteous greeting and closing. Helps to make your e-mail not seem demanding or terse.
  3. Address your contact with the appropriate level of formality and make sure you spelled their name correctly
  4. Spell check - emails with typos are simply not taken as seriously
  5. Read your email out loud to ensure the tone is that which you desire. Try to avoid relying on formatting for emphasis; rather choose the words that reflect your meaning instead
  6. Be sure you are including all relevant details or information necessary to understand your request or point of view
  7. Refrain from using the Reply to All feature to give your opinion to those who may not be interested. In most cases replying to the Sender alone is your best course of action
  8. Type in complete sentences. To type random phrases or cryptic thoughts does not lend to clear communication
  9. Always acknowledge emails from those you know in a timely manner
  10. Be sure the Subject: field accurately reflects the content of your email
  11. Keep emails brief and to the point
  12. Always end your emails with "Thank you," "Sincerely," "Best regards" 
  13. Avoid unnecessarily large file sizes. Digital photos especially, learn how to resize your digital photographs
  14. Don't type in CAPITALS as this is considered to be SHOUTING. This is one of the rudest things you can do.
  15. Use BCCs (Blind Carbon Copies) when addressing a message to a group of people who don't necessarily know each other
  16. Don't write anything you wouldn't say in public
  17. Be Professional, stay away from abbreviations and don't use emoticons (the little smiley faces).
  18. Ask Before You Send an Attachment: Because of large size attachments or computer viruses, many people won't open attachments unless they know the sender, ask the recipient first
  19. Think before you forward! Get the sender's permission first
  20. Don't send confidential or secret information through email. Email messages are more like postcards than sealed letters; they pass through many computers to get to their destination.

 

Remember, the content of an email includes the character of the person who wrote it, so try to make a good impression every time.

4
  8530 Hits
8530 Hits

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://pm4dev.com/

Contact information

1201 Peachtree St, Suite 622
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
info@pm4dev.com
P.O. Box 27321
Washington DC. 20038
United States